Yes, friends, it has indeed been a long time, and much has happened. To borrow a phrase from the golden age of the soap opera: It is later that same day...

Several months ago, quite a while, in fact, a friend from church gave me an old computer that she had outgrown, and was planning to toss. She knew how much I needed an upgrade, as I was using a nearly 10 year old Pentium 3 (I know!), so she rescued her old Pentium 4 from the dust bin and donated it to my cause. Well, the machine was not in its prime to begin with, and it seems her son had tinkered with it, and it wasn't working (which was why she was throwing it out in the first place; she had already moved on, and it wasn't worth it to her to get it repaired), and I wasn't sure what it would take to get it fixed (repaired, not neutered [sorry, I just can't keep that joke from showing up]); at any rate, I finally took it to the shop. It turned out to be far less costly to repair than I had feared, and before long I had a great Pentium 4 computer with a lot of the bells and whistles I had been lacking before.

Enter Murphy and his Law. While this new machine was in the shop, my old one, the P. 3, the one that crashed whenever I tried to watch a YouTube video, bit the dust. To be honest, I think it's something relatively simple, like a busted power switch, but I couldn't see having both computers in the shop at the same time, especially since I had no idea of the cost of fixing either one. The upshot of all this is that for about three weeks I was destitute; no computer, no internet, no email, not so much as a solitaire game to my name. (That is, at home. I could access my email from work.)

Eventually, I got the new (used) computer back, and it works, and I've now spent a week or so reconfiguring it to fit my own needs. It is one thing to take a brand-new computer and impress your personality on it, but to take a used computer and try to convince it that you're not Susan, well, it adds an extra layer of challenge, to say the least. Not that it isn't fun. I know that the end result will be, and is already, worth the effort, and I am enjoying the process. And I have already expressed to Susan my appreciation for her thoughtfulness and generosity, and now I will say publicly (How many of you are out there?) what I have said in private, "Susan, I can't thank you enough for the gift of this computer. Even in these early stages of transition, it is being quite useful and productive, and I can tell that the next year or so are going to be much easier and more fun because of you. Bless you!"

Of course, the reason I brought all of this up is because of the impact my personal woes have had on the progress of The Pulpit. I am in, as you know, if you exist, a series of articles on the subject of money. It's about attitudes, about un-learning some of the wrong information we have been heir to from the past, about finding out the information God has for us in His Word, and applying it His way to our lives and situations today. I am still writing the articles, but the latest one, which was about two-thirds finished when Murphy got involved, is stuck in the hard-drive of my old P. 3 computer, and so the series is on hold for another couple of weeks at least, until I can haul yet another computer to the shop. (I also have hundreds of pics from my wife's and my digital cameras, locked up in there, so salvaging the hard-drive is a top priority for more that one reason.)

My point is that I have not abandoned the Pulpit, nor the Money series. I have been on a sort of forced sabbatical lately, but I'm on my way back. The future is ahead, the past is behind, and the present hardly exists at all. (I just made that up. Could you tell?)

Cheers, and God Bless,
Dave
aka St Enoch
aka Bagg O'Hammers
 


Comments

Thu, 21 Oct 2010 00:52:01

The journey of life there are many, Are also well, Who are busy day for harvest, Can harvest has also bitter sweet. Both are rich people are poor, Jack is difficult to buy fitness, So I hope you always happy.

 



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